What’s New about the Child Tax Credit in 2021?

This page will be regularly updated as new information becomes available.

Last updated 08/24/2021

What is the Child Tax Credit (CTC)?

The Child Tax Credit (CTC) helps offset the costs of raising kids. Nearly every family is eligible to receive the 2021 CTC this year, including families that haven’t filed a tax return and families that don’t have recent income. Each qualifying household is eligible to receive up to $3,600 for each child under 6, and $3,000 for each child between 6 and 17. The credit is not a loan. Families can receive half of their new credit between July and December 2021 and the remaining half in 2022 when they file a tax return.

What is new about the CTC in 2021?

The 2021 CTC is different than before in 6 key ways:

  1. Increases the tax credit amount. The tax credit’s maximum amount is $3,000 per child and $3,600 for children under 6.
  2. Makes the credit fully refundable. Even if you don’t owe taxes, you could get the full CTC refund.
  3. Removes the minimum income requirement. You can have zero income and still claim the CTC.
  4. Raises the qualifying age. Children 17 and under can qualify for the credit.
  5. Provides advance payments. If you already qualify for the current CTC when you filed your 2020 tax return (which you file in 2021), you can start receiving part of the new credit during 2021. You don’t have to wait until you file your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022). The IRS will send you monthly payments for half your new credit between July and December 2021.
  6. Lowers the phase out rate. The CTC amount will start to gradually decrease starting at $75,000 ($150,000 for married couples and $112,500 for head of household).
Click to see a chart to compare the new changes to the CTC
$2,000 CTC (current) 2021 CTC (new)
Age of child Children age 16 and under can qualify for the credit Children age 17 and under can qualify for the credit
Credit Amount $2,000 per child $3,000 per child and $3,600 for children under the age of 6
Refund Amount Up to $1,400 per child is refundable Fully refundable
Income You must have earned income more than $2,500 to qualify for the refundable part of the credit No income requirement, you can have zero income and still qualify for the full credit amount per child
Advance Payments No advance payments Periodic advance payments between July to December 2021
Phase Out Rate The CTC amount will start to decrease at $200,000 for single filers and heads of households ($400,000 for married couples) The CTC amount will start to decrease at $75,000 for single filers ($150,000 for married couples and $112,500 for heads of households)

This is a temporary one-year expansion of the CTC for your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022).

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Eligibility

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1. Am I eligible for the 2021 Child Tax Credit?

There are three main criteria to claim the 2021 CTC:

  1. Income: There is no minimum income requirement to claim the new CTC. However, the CTC will start to decrease when you make $75,000 if single ($150,000 for married couples and $112,500 for heads of households). Each $1,000 of income above the phase-out level reduces your CTC amount by $50.
  2. Taxpayer Identification Number: You and your spouse need to have an SSN or an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN).
  3. Qualifying Child: Children claimed for the CTC must be “qualifying children.”

To claim children for the CTC, they must pass the following “qualifying child” tests:

Relationship: The child must be your child, grandchild, stepchild or adopted child; younger sibling, step-sibling, half-sibling, or their descendent; or a foster child placed with you by a government agency. Note: if you are the child’s legal guardian, that is considered a child placed with you by a government agency.

Age: The child must be 17 or under on December 31, 2021.

Residency: The child must live with you in the U.S. for more than half the year. Time living together doesn’t have to be consecutive. There is an exception for non-custodial parents who are permitted by the custodial parent to claim the child as a dependent (a waiver form signed by the custodial parent is required).

Taxpayer Identification Number: Children claimed for the CTC must have a valid social security number (SSN).

Support: The child does not provide more than half of their own support in 2021.

Dependency: The child must be considered a dependent for tax filing purposes.

Note: If you are separated or divorced, you and your (former) spouse can’t claim different tax credits for the same child. For example, if you take turns claiming a child on a tax return, and you claim a child for the CTC this year, you will also have to claim that child for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) this year, if you are eligible. For more information about custody and the Child Tax Credit, click here to learn more.

2. What if I get government benefits? Will these payments count against eligibility?

Tax credit refunds, including the CTC, don’t count as income against federally funded benefit programs like SNAP, TANF, Medicaid, or the housing choice voucher program (Section 8). Tax credit refunds that are saved are not counted toward asset limits in such programs for 12 months.

3. Do advance payments count as income? Do I need to report it on my tax return?

No. Advance payments are not income and do not need to be reported as income on your tax return. These payments are early payments of your 2021 Child Tax Credit, which you would normally claim as part of your tax refund when you file your tax return. Even though the advance payments don’t need to be reported on your tax return, in January 2022, the IRS will send you Letter 6419 that tells you the total amount of advance payments sent to you in 2021. Please keep this letter for your tax records. On your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022), you may need to refer to this notice to claim your remaining CTC.

4. Do I need a Social Security Number (SSN) to get the 2021 Child Tax Credit and advance payments?

You (and your spouse if you are married, filing jointly) can have either a Social Security Number (SSN) or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to get the CTC and advance payments.

Children you claim for the CTC must have valid SSNs.

Click here to learn more about how to get an ITIN.

5. Can my advance payments be reduced if I owe child support payments, back taxes, federal or state debt, or money to creditors or debt collectors?

No. The IRS will not reduce or offset your advance payments to pay past-due child support, back taxes, and federal or state debts. However, they are not protected from garnishment by creditors and debt collectors.

When you file your tax return and receive the rest of your CTC as part of your tax refund, it can be reduced to pay past-due child support payments, back taxes, Federal or state debts, and garnishment by creditors and debt collectors.

6. How much will my 2021 Child Tax Credit amount decrease by if I have a higher income?

The 2021 CTC will be reduced in two steps:

  1. The CTC will be reduced to $2,000 per child: It will reduce by $50 for each $1,000 that you are above the income threshold ($75,000 for single filers, $150,000 for married couples, and $112,500 for heads of households) until the CTC reaches $2,000.
  2. The CTC will be reduced again to below $2,000 per child: It will reduce by $50 for each $1,000 that you are above the income threshold ($200,000 for single filers and heads of households and $400,000 for married couples) until the CTC reaches $0.

If you qualify for the $2,000 CTC, you will also receive advance payments.

Read here to see if you are eligible for the $2,000 CTC.

Getting your CTC and advance payments

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7. How do I get the 2021 Child Tax Credit and get advance payments?

You don’t need to do anything to get the advance payments if you:

  • Filed a tax return for tax year 2019 or 2020. Your tax return is used to determine eligibility for advance payments even if you didn’t claim the CTC on your tax return.
  • Successfully submitted your information using the 2020 IRS Non-Filers tool (the one used to get your stimulus payments).

The IRS started sending notices about eligibility for the advance CTC payments in June. The IRS will automatically send your monthly advance payments for each qualifying child from July 15, 2021 to December 15, 2021.

If you don’t fall into the above categories, you have two options to get the advance payments:

  • If you aren’t normally required to file taxes, you can use the new IRS Non-filer Portal to submit a simplified tax return. You’ll be able to enter your information, including the number and ages of your qualifying children to receive advance payments this year.
Click to see a table to check if you're required to file a 2020 tax return
Filing Status 2020 Gross Income (Taxpayers under 65) 2020 Gross Income (Taxpayers over 65)
Single $12,400 $14,050
Head of Household $18,650 $20,300
Married Filing Jointly $24,800 (both spouses) $26,100 (one spouse)
$27,400 (both spouses)
Married Filing Separately $5 $5
Qualifying Widow with Dependent Child $24,800 $26,100
  • If you’re required to file taxes, you need to file a 2020 tax return to receive advance payments of the new credit this year.

If you earned any income, we recommend filing taxes whether or not you have a filing requirement, as you may be eligible for other valuable tax credits, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit, which can give you more money back in your tax refund.

The new CTC is for your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022). The advance payments will give you half of your CTC amount in 2021. You will have to file a tax return in 2022 to get the rest.

If you are a first-time filer, you will need a Taxpayer Identification Number. This can be an SSN or ITIN.

Click here to learn more about how to get an ITIN.

8. What if I didn’t file a 2019 or 2020 tax return and I didn’t use the 2020 IRS Non-Filer tool? How can I claim the 2021 Child Tax Credit and get advance payments?

If you aren’t normally required to file taxes, use the new IRS Non-filer Portal. This tool allows you to sign up for the CTC advance payments and claim any missed stimulus checks. You will be asked to provide your information, including the number and ages of your qualifying children.

If you have a filing requirement or are eligible for other tax credits, you will need to file a 2020 tax return to get the CTC advance payments.

9. How much money will I get from the 2021 Child Tax Credit? When will I get the payments?

 The 2021 CTC is worth up to $3,600 for children under six and up to $3,000 for children ages 6-17. Half the credit will be delivered through monthly payments in 2021. You can get the remaining half when you file a tax return in 2022.

Advance payments started in July 2021. If you haven’t received your payments, you can sign up for the payments through late fall. Once the IRS has processed the information you provided from either the IRS Non-filer Portal or your 2020 tax return, you will start receiving the CTC advance payments. These payments will be half of your CTC, even if you started receiving them after July.

Example: Catlin has a 12-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son and earned $12,000 in 2020. When he filed his 2020 tax return (which you file in 2021), he claimed the current CTC and received a total of $1,425 in 2021. Because of the new rule changes to the CTC, when he files his 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022), his CTC will be worth $6,600. Through the advance payments, he will start receiving half of his new credit in 2021 ($3,300) in monthly payments from the IRS between July and December 2021. He will claim the remaining amount when he files his tax return in 2022.

You can use Propel’s 2021 Child Tax Credit Calculator to calculate how much money you will receive from the CTC.

10. How will the advance payments be sent?

If the IRS already has your banking information because you had a tax refund directly deposited, your advance payments will be sent as a direct deposit. The direct deposits will be labeled as “ChildCTC.” The IRS will use the sources listed below (in order) to know which bank account to deposit your payments in:

  1. Your 2020 tax return
  2. Your 2019 tax return or the information you submitted to the IRS 2020 Non-Filer tool to get your stimulus checks
  3. Information you submitted to Get My Payment in 2020
  4. A federal agency that sends you benefits (eg: Social Security Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, or the Railroad Retirement Board)

If the IRS does not have any of your banking information, your advance payments will be sent by mail.

11. Is there a deadline to sign up for advance CTC payments?

You can submit your information to the IRS through late fall. After the IRS processes the information you provide through the IRS Non-filer Portal or by filing a 2020 tax return, you will begin receiving advance payments. If you sign up after payments are first issued in July, your monthly payments will be larger so that you still get half of your CTC amount in 2021. If you don’t receive some or all of your advance payments, you can still file your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022) to receive the full amount of the new CTC.

IRS Non-Filer Portal

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12. What is the IRS Non-Filer Portal used for?

You can use the IRS Non-filer Portal to:

  • Sign up for the CTC and advance payments
  • Sign up for the third stimulus check
  • Get your first and second stimulus check as the Recovery Rebate Credit (if you didn’t get them or didn’t get the full amounts that you are eligible for)

You can use the IRS Non-filer Portal to claim your first and second stimulus check even if you don’t qualify for the Child Tax Credit. You will need to know how much money you are owed from the first and second stimulus check. Check out this IRS Non-filer Portal guide for step-by-step instructions.

You can only use the IRS Non-Filer portal if you haven’t filed a 2020 tax return (which you file in 2021) and you don’t need to file a tax return (check the table in Question 7 to see if you’re required to file a 2020 tax return).

If you have already filed a 2020 tax return (which you file in 2021), you will automatically get your CTC advance payments. If you haven’t filed a 2020 tax return and are required to file or are eligible for additional tax credits by filing, you will need to file a tax return to get you CTC advance payments.

13. How do I sign-up for the CTC advance payments using the IRS Non-Filer portal?

You can follow this IRS Non-Filer Form Guide, which includes screenshots and step-by-step instructions. This guide also tells you what you will need to complete the form and provides alternatives if you are missing some of the required information.

For example, the form requires a home address. If you are unhoused or don’t have a permanent address, you can ask your local shelter or service provider if you can use their address on the form. You can also ask to use a trusted relative’s or friend’s address. The IRS will deliver checks to P.O. boxes.

Click here to learn more about filling out the IRS Non-filer form.

IRS Child Tax Credit Update Portal (CTC UP)

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14. What is the Child Tax Credit Update Portal (CTC UP) used for?

The IRS Child Tax Credit Update Portal (CTC UP) allows you to opt out of advance CTC payments. You may want to do this if you aren’t eligible for the advance payments or if you prefer to receive the full refund when you file your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022). See Question 17 to understand more about opting out of payments. You can also add or change bank account information to get direct deposit or change the address where your payments are mailed.

Later in the year, the CTC portal will allow you to make other updates, including updating the number of dependents you have, your income, or your marital status. For example, if you have or will have a new baby this year, you will be able to update your number of qualifying children on the CTC portal. Life changes can affect the amount of CTC you are eligible for. Making updates will help make sure that the IRS is sending you the correct amount of your CTC.

15. How do I use the Child Tax Credit Update Portal to opt out of advance payments?

You can use this CTC UP Guide, which includes screenshots and step-by-step instructions to create an account, check your eligibility for advance payments, get information about monthly payment amounts, opt out of advance payments, and other features of the portal.

16. When can I update my family, address, banking, and income information on the Child Tax Credit Update Portal?

Date You Can Make Changes (subject to change) What You Can Do
June 21
  • Find out if you’re eligible
  • Unenroll from payments
  • See a list of your payments
June 30
  • Make changes to your bank information for your payments beginning in August
August 20
  • Make changes to your address
Late summer
  • Make changes to your dependents, marital status, and income
  • Re-enroll if you previously unenrolled

Source: IRS 2021 Child Tax Credit and Advance Child Tax Credit Payments

17. Why would I want to opt out of CTC advance payments?

Advance payments allow you to receive half of your CTC through monthly payments sent from July to December 2021. If you opt out of advance payments, you are choosing to receive your full Child Tax Credit ($3,600 per child under age 6 and $3,000 per child age 6 to 17) when you file your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022).

Here are some reasons why you may want to unenroll from getting CTC advance payments:

  • Changes to your household: Advance payments are based on your 2019 or 2020 tax return. If you claimed a child on your 2019 or 2020 tax return and that child no longer lives with you in 2021, you are no longer eligible for the CTC and advance payments for that child. There is an exception if the other parent agrees to allow you to get the advance payments and CTC (a waiver form signed by the custodial parent is required).
  • Changes to your income: You qualify for the CTC advance payments based on your income on your 2019 or 2020 tax return. If in 2021, you earn more money and are no longer eligible for the full CTC, you may want to opt out. Refer to Question 6 to see how the CTC decreases.
  • Prefer one large payment: You would rather receive your CTC in one payment when you file your 2021 tax return (which your file in 2022). Example: You are planning to move to a new apartment with your family, which requires a large deposit. You would rather wait to receive your entire CTC payment in 2022 for the deposit instead of receiving smaller, monthly payments.
  • Changes to your payment information: Your mailing address has changed since you filed your 2019 or 2020 tax return, which means the IRS will send advance payments to the wrong address. CTC UP will allow you to change your address.

While you may be concerned about repaying back your CTC advance payments, Congress has enacted repayment protection for families with lower incomes if the IRS overpays you. Depending on your income, you may not have to pay anything back (see Question 25 for more information).

In addition, if you are married filing jointly, remember that your spouse also needs to unenroll if your household does not want to receive any advance payments. If your spouse does not unenroll, your spouse will still get half of the joint advance payments.

Source: Code for America’s Reasons to Opt-out of AdvCTC

18. What is the deadline to opt out of CTC advance payments?

Payment Month Unenrollment Deadline Payment Date
July 6/28/2021 7/15/2021
August 8/2/2021 8/13/2021
September 8/30/2021 9/15/2021
October 10/4/2021 10/15/2021
November 11/1/2021 11/15/2021
December 11/29/2021 12/15/2021

You must opt out by 11:59pm Eastern Time on the unenrollment deadline. You don’t need to opt out each month. If you miss the deadline to opt out you will get your next scheduled advance payment until your unenrollment request has been processed (which can take up to 7 calendar days).

If you need to, you’ll be able to re-enroll for CTC advance payments in late September 2021.

Troubleshooting

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19. What if I share custody of my child? Who will get to claim the 2021 Child Tax Credit and advance payments?

Only one person — whoever lives with the child for more than half the year — can claim the CTC. If you claimed your child on your 2020 tax return (or 2019 return if you haven’t filed your 2020 tax return), starting in July 2021 you should have automatically begun receiving half of the new CTC through advance payments. You will receive the rest of the CTC when you file a 2021 tax return in 2022.

If your child no longer lives with you in 2021, file a 2020 tax return, if you haven’t, so the IRS has your most recent information. Or, if you have already filed a 2020 tax return, update information about your child using the CTC Update Portal, when this feature is available.

If more than one parent or guardian lived with your child for more than half of the year, the person who claimed the child on the most recent tax return will be the parent who receives the advance payments. The same situation applies if you and other relatives both care for and live with the child.

The eligible parent or relative who receives the advance payments should be the same person to claim the CTC on their 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022), to receive the remaining half of the credit. If the other parent or relative claims the CTC instead, the IRS will question whether the 2021 advance payments were made improperly. The IRS may need to take additional steps to determine who can rightfully claim the child, which may delay the delivery of tax refunds.

Custody Changes:

You can update your custody arrangement, if it has changed since your 2019 return, by filing a 2020 tax return (which you file in 2021) if you haven’t already filed. If you have already filed a 2020 return, it may be possible to use the CTC Update Portal to make changes to your custody arrangement later in the year. The IRS will provide more details and we will update this page as information becomes available.

This will allow you to receive the current CTC and possibly receive the advance payments of the 2021 CTC.

20. What if my advance payments are based on my 2019 tax return and I recently filed my 2020 tax return with changes? Will the IRS update the amounts of my advance payments?

Yes. As soon as the IRS processes your 2020 tax return, the amount of your advance payments will be adjusted if there are changes to your income, number of qualifying children, or filing status.

21. What if my CTC advance payment amount is wrong?

Your CTC advance payments may be too little or too much. Your advance payment amount may be wrong because:

  • The number of children in your household has changed. You may have a new baby in 2021 or your children are no longer living with you.
  • Your income has changed. Your income may be lower or higher in 2021. Since advance payments are based on your 2019 or 2020 tax return, the payments may not accurately reflect how much you currently make.
  • Your marital status has changed. If you got divorced in 2021 and you will be claiming the children on your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022), you may be missing all or some of the advance payments that you are eligible for.
  • Garnishment. While your CTC advance payments are protected from tax debts, state and federal debts, and past-due child support, the advance payments are not protected from garnishment by your state, local government, and private creditors.

To adjust your advance payment amounts you can:

  • File your 2020 tax return. If you haven’t filed your 2020 tax return, you can file it to provide the IRS with your most current information, such as your number of children, income, and marital status.
  • Update your information in CTC UP. Later in the year, you can update your children, income, and marital status in CTC UP to ensure that your advance payment amounts are correct. After you submit your information, the IRS will adjust the amount of your advance payments.
  • Opt out of advance payments. You can also choose to opt out of advance payments now and re-enroll later in the year when you can update your information.
  • Request your garnished advance payment to be released. Request if your state, local government, or financial institution can release your advance payment to you.

22. What if I filed a 2020 tax return, but the IRS still hasn’t processed my 2020 tax return?

The IRS will use your 2019 tax return to determine if you’re eligible for advance payments and if you are, the amount you will get. Once your 2020 tax return is processed, your payment amount may change.

23. If I haven’t filed a tax return in years, can I still sign up for CTC advance payments? What if I owe taxes?

Yes. Even if you haven’t filed a tax return recently, you can still sign up for CTC advance payments, if you are eligible. Not everyone is required to file taxes.

If you are under the income requirements to file a 2020 tax return (check the table in Question 7), you can use the IRS Non-filer Portal to sign-up for advance payments.

If you’re not required to file, you may want to file a 2020 tax return to get additional tax credits that you may be eligible for, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). There is no penalty for not filing in the past if you don’t owe taxes. If you want to claim other tax credits, then you cannot use the Non-filer Portal and will need to file a regular tax return.

If you haven’t filed a tax return for this year or previous years, and you think you may owe taxes, refer to “Filing Past Due Tax Returns” on the IRS website to learn what to do.

You may be subject to penalties and fines for not filing or not paying taxes. However, you can request penalty relief. If you owe taxes and can’t pay them in full, it is important to pay what you can and make a plan. Consider using a payment plan. Note that if you don’t pay the amount owed in full, you will be charged interest and penalties.

To learn more about your different payment options based on your financial situation, read What to Do if I Owe Taxes but Can’t Pay Them.

Your CTC advance payments will not be reduced if you have overdue tax debt. However, when you file your 2021 tax return in 2022 to claim the other half of your CTC, your tax refund may be reduced to pay for any taxes you owe and other federal or state debts.

24. I haven’t received my advance payment. What do I do?

You can check to see if and where your advance payment has been issued on the Child Tax Credit Update Portal.

If your payment has been issued, you can request a payment trace to track your payment. The IRS will be able to track your payment after you wait:

  • 5 days since the deposit date and the bank says it hasn’t received the payment
  • 4 weeks since the payment was mailed by check to a standard address
  • 6 weeks since the payment was mailed, and you have a forwarding address on file with the local post office
  • 9 weeks since the payment was mailed, and you have a foreign address

To start a payment trace, mail or fax a completed Form 3911, Taxpayer Statement Regarding Refund.

25. What if I receive more money than I should as part of the advance payments for the 2021 Child Tax Credit?

Congress enacted a repayment protection for families with lower incomes if the IRS overpays you. If your 2021 income is less than $40,000 ($60,000 for married couples and $50,000 for heads of households), you are not required to repay anything back.

This protection only applies if you are overpaid because there are changes to the number of children you claim, not changes in income. The protection amount gradually decreases as your income increases. If your 2021 income is $80,000 or above ($120,000 for married couples and $100,000 for heads of households), you are required to repay the full excess amount.

If you earn more than the protection allows and receive more money than you should through advance payments in 2021, the IRS may require you to pay back the excess amount when you file your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022). This means that you will either owe more taxes or see a decrease in your tax refund.

An example is if you received advanced payments for a child who lived with you in 2020 but moved in March 2021. Once you file taxes in 2022 (for Tax Year 2021), you will have to pay the money back if your income is over $40,000 (single), $60,000 (married filing jointly), or $50,000 (head of household).

The CTC Update Portal provides the opportunity to opt out of advance payments if you’re  unsure if you will be eligible for the 2021 CTC (e.g., you anticipate that your income will change or the dependents you can claim will change). The portal will soon allow you to update your information (the number of dependents you have, your income, or your marital status) which will help the IRS to pay you the correct amount.

26. Are these new changes to the CTC permanent?

Maybe. The new rule changes to the CTC are temporary. They only apply to your 2021 tax return (which you file in 2022).  Legislation is being proposed to extend the changes.

Need help with filing your taxes?

If it’s your first time filing or you need help filing your tax return to claim the CTC, you can:

 Check out more Child Tax Credit Resources

  • Child Tax Credit IRS Non-filer Form Guide: Use this guide if you are not planning to file a 2020 federal tax return to get your CTC advance payments or any missing stimulus checks. This is for individuals and families who don’t have a filing requirement and the IRS does not have your information in the tax system.
  • Child Tax Credit Update Portal Guide: Use this guide for step-by-step instructions (with screenshots) on how to sign-up for and use CTC UP to make changes to your CTC information (marital status, number of children, bank account information, and mailing address) or opt-out of CTC advance payments.
  • GetCTC.org: This site explains the Child Tax Credit, eligibility, and how to get the credit. It includes links to help people sign up for the credit and to use the Child Tax Credit Update Portal. Around late August/early September, it will feature a mobile-friendly Non-filer tool. The site is also available in Spanish.
  • ChildTaxCredit.com: This website features FAQs and a CTC eligibility calculator that can help you understand how much you can get from the credit.
  • LetsGetSet.co: This website offers tools and resources to help new parents making less than $40k access and save tax credits. New and expecting parents can sign up for texts by using this link via a web browser on their phone: letsgetset.link/getitback or by texting “CTC” to 844-921-5747 to stay informed about key updates in the portals (like when the feature to add a child born in 2021 goes live), get links to resources, and text-in questions.
  • 2021 Child Tax Credit Outreach Resources: Interested in spreading the word about the Child Tax Credit? This outreach hub features a CTC outreach toolkit, navigator training and resources to help people sign-up for advance payments, multilingual CTC outreach resources, research on CTC-eligible households, and more.

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